Marketing Funnels

Direct Response Marketing Strategy and marketing/sales funnel information.

Articles by Lynn SwayzeClientsMarketing Funnels

The Case For Specialization

le-tan-604523-unsplashPhoto by Lê Tân on Unsplash
views
14

If you’re having trouble with knowing what to write in your blog posts…

… or what to share on social media…

… or where to find your ideal clients…

… then today’s post is for you.

What I reveal today may very well blow the lid on your existing marketing efforts and finally get you the wins you the deserve.

Sound fair?

Good.

So let’s get down to it.

The secret to getting more leads and sales isn’t always a matter of having the right process.

Sure, that helps, but it’s not the whole picture.

That’s because one principle I’ve learned as a result of building the 11 Marketing Factors is that specialization wins when you want to attract high quality clients, earn more respect, and achieve more success as a consultant, copywriter, or other service-based entrepreneur.

Which means, if you have the right tactics but not the right focus, then all your hard work will be for naught.

(That is to say, you’ll have wasted your precious and irreplaceable time on tasks which won’t actually push the needle.)

Specialization – especially when combined with my 11 Marketing Factors – helps you know exactly:

  • Who you serve, and where to find them
  • What you sell, which is something they desperately want
  • What to sell it for, which is within their “Pricing Goldilocks Zone”
  • What problems it must solve, which they have in spades

… and much, much more.

When you know these things, you’ll be able to know with complete confidence whether a big idea, offer, or marketing message will work, because you’ll know your prospect as well as you know yourself.

Your stories will actually resonate with your audience more often.

Your offers will land with responses like, “This is EXACTLY what I need!”

Your pain point descriptions will make them say, “This is me!”

And your buyers? Well, they’ll be the kind of people who will actually use and implement what they buy.

But  this stuff doesn’t come by accident. It comes when you’re deliberate about the 11 Marketing Factors and when you SPECIALIZE.

So if you’re having trouble getting enough clients, then it’s time to niche down even further. W

Here are some more benefits to specialization:

** INDUSTRY EXPERTISE **

Imagine knowing everything that’s going on in your industry. Who the players are, what offers are being made, what’s working, what’s not working. You know the industry inside and out, and that lets you create better marketing than your “competition”. So you never sound like a copy-cat or a wannabe… you’re a leader who’s always one step ahead.

** AVATAR EXPERTISE **

Diving deep into the market also allows you to know exactly what your ideal buyer struggles with. You know what other “gurus” they’ve worked with. You know the books they’ve read. You know where they’ve succeeded, where they’ve failed, and what a “win” looks like for them. You even know what “trigger words” to include in your  marketing to make them buy.

** EXCELLENCY OF RESULTS **

Specialization allows you to master the delivery of a very specific result in a very specific way. You become proficient in consistently getting the promised result for your client. So you get more referrals, more positive testimonials, and more amazing case studies every time you take on a client. Which in turn keeps your calendar booked with amazing clients who pay well. Win-win for everyone!

** EFFICIENCY OF RESULTS**

In addition to consistently getting excellent results, you’re also going to get those results efficiently. You’ll be able to know how to do that thing – whatever it is you do – with speed because you’ll have seen so many permutations of the same problem. You’ll have enough experience to know when to do X instead of Y… or when Z is really best. So you end up doing less work while getting better results for higher pay and more respect.

If you’d like to learn more about the Eleven Marketing Factors and how they help you build a competition-proof business with stronger marketing, then you’ll want to get on my list to be first in line to get a copy. The first 15 will even get a FREE copy.

Opt in to the insider’s list by sending me a PM. I’ll personally reach out when it’s ready… AND I’ll rush the condensed 3-page version as a thank you for being so awesome.

Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

You Wrote a Book. Now What?

chris-lawton-236413-unsplash
views
28

So, I’ve been reaching out to consultants with books this past week to test some new cold outreach training I have.

And I’m surprised (not in a good way) at the number of books I’ve found on Amazon where authors:

  1. Don’t use their book to grow a list
  2. Don’t have a website listed ANYWHERE in their book
  3. Have no post-book offer (e.g., bonus resources, free videos, etc)
  4. If they have a website, they don’t have FUNNELS, e.g., book funnel, lead magnets, webinars, etc.

And I’m going to go out on a limb and say that they’re probably not using their book in a shock and awe package to prospects, to book podcasts, or to get a foot in the door on TV.

If your book ISN’T making you money, the reason is the above. Books are ideal for consultants, and to go to the trouble of writing one and then NOT take advantage is kind of silly.

If you’re a consultant who HASN’T written a book but are thinking about it, here’s what I suggest:

  1. Write the damn book. If you need help, contact Rob at http://anspachmedia.com/ or check out Bob Bly’s “Write and Sell Kindle Ebooks for Fun and Profit”
  2.  When you write it, include a BONUS OFFER in the front area, back area, and back cover. See Dan S. Kennedy’s “No B.S.” books as an example.
  3. Use that bonus offer to grow your list of qualified leads, because anyone who’s going to spend a few hours with you on your book topic is going to have the problem you solve.
  4. Sell products and offers to that list. Email daily.
  5. Use your newly published book to get in front of other people’s traffic, such as on podcasts, guest posts, speaking engagements, and YouTube.
  6. Use the book in “shock and awe” packages to prospects you really want to work with. Think $10K+ accounts. What’s $15-$100 to mail a package when you get $10K back? No brainer!
  7. Give an extra copy of your book to clients to give to a friend as a “gift”. Include a free consultation call with you inside the book.

That’s really it. If you’d like help designing a strategy around books, or to write the funnel copy, you know where to find me. Simply email hello@lynnswayze.com to start the conversation.

Here’s to your health, wealth, and abundance,

Lynn Swayze

P.S. There’s a way to do this with fiction too. 🙂

P.P.S. Bob Bly has a lot of resources, including a course on becoming a six figure consultant. Get them all here.

 

Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

The Death of Marketing

nico-bhlr-771563-unsplash
views
27

I have a secret to share about marketers.

In truth, you’ve probably noticed it yourself, because you’re smart.

You caffeinated enough for this?

So, marketers do this thing which is meant to FLIP your current beliefs and PERSUADE you to buy.

I call it the “Option Narrowing” approach, but I’m sure there’s a name for it.

Here’s how it looks:

“X IS DEAD!”

(Insert: emails, direct mail, Facebook, LinkedIn, blogging, social media, blah blah blah…)

When you see that, you know that the marketer is getting ready to pitch some niche service using a specific formula… probably at a high ticket cost to you.

Almost always at a high ticket cost.

It annoys me because it’s not true.

I mean, it’s effective, don’t get me wrong. But it’s falser than the eyelashes on Dita Von Teese.

The truth is that marketing is like MATH.

I’ve said this a million times to clients, and I’ll say it again:

Like tumblers in a lock, everything opens up for you in marketing when all the elements are in alignment.

If it’s not working, there’s a piece missing. Keep going. Keep tweaking.

Marketing works when you are…

🔥 Reaching your buyers where they are now…

🔥 Attracting them with messages they want to hear…

🔥 Validating their concerns…

🔥 Presenting them with a solution…

That’s when they’ll buy.

The “Marketing Trifecta” works no matter the medium. Attract, Indoctrinate, Convert.

So attract with a Facebook ad…

Indoctrinate with a VSL or webinar…

Convert with the sales page…

Boom.

Or attract with the blog post…

Indoctrinate through the opt-in and emails…

Convert with the sales page…

Up to you. Again, you’ll want to use whatever is in alignment with WHO YOU ARE (your persona) and who you’re attracting (your person).

It all works IF you’re doing it right.

If you want a resource for building an even better marketing campaign with all the right “elements”, head to LynnSwayze.com/11FactorsFree.

 

Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

Lead Magnets 101: What they are, how they benefit you, and 18 different types to grow your business

views
17


This is part 2 of an ongoing series called “Marketing 101”. In this series, we’ll discuss common direct response marketing lingo and break it down so it actually makes sense. In today’s article we’ll discuss “lead magnets”, or the basics of using a free “lead magnet” in your marketing funnel. 


What is a Lead Magnet


If you’re here, it’s likely you’ve heard of the term “lead magnet” and and to know more. You may know it’s needed, but what is it,  exactly? 


According to MarketingTerms.com, a lead magnet is: “A specific deliverable that is offered to prospects in return for contact information, typically to join an email list.” 


More specifically, they go on to say that: “To be a lead magnet, an offer must be specific and short-term in nature. A lead magnet can be though of as something that “sits on the other side of” an opt in form, just waiting to be triggered. This is the opposite of vague promises to join a newsletter and receive unspecified content at an unspecified time.” 


As a direct response marketer, one of the main tools in the toolbox is a lead magnet. It’s often one of the first marketing assets I build with clients or the first set of assets I recommend. That’s because lead magnets are so useful for identifying your ideal prospect, attracting him/her to your business, and nurturing them until they purchase from you. 


Benefits of a Lead Magnet


As mentioned, lead magnets are immensely valuable in growing your list of qualified prospects for your business. But that’s not the only benefit of going through the lead magnet building process. Here are a few more benefits of creating lead magnets for your business:


  • Helps you define the wants, needs, desires, and “psychographics” of your ideal prospect
  • Helps you identify where your ideal prospects “hangs out”, so you can reach them
  • Generates a value-first asset your sales people can use to generate interest (such as on LinkedIn)
  • Targets a specific portion of the population who has the problem you solve
  • Gives you an “open door” to nurture the prospect via email, mail, or phone, because the prospect as specifically requested to hear from you
  • “Proves” that you know what you’re doing as a consultant or information marketer by providing proof of your value up front
  • Grows your email or mailing list of highly qualified prospects
  • Contributes to you earning more revenue in your business
  • Serves as the start of your multi-step marketing funnel


With these benefits, it seems silly to avoid using lead magnets to grow your small business.


Lead Magnet Examples


Lead magnets are everywhere. To prove it, let’s look at a few examples so you can learn how to spot them “in the wild” for yourself. 


Ecommerce


Here’s an ecommerce example from a retailer selling a unique “gap-free” shirt for women:


A lead magnet example from the-shirt.com


The lead magnet here is the free coupon, which I can only claim when I exchange it for my email address. In ecommerce, lead magnets tend to come in the form of coupons, giveaways, and free samples. 


Note: Paid samples (such as miniature perfume sets for $10) are an example of a tripwire offer.


Lawyer / Legal Firm


Here’s another lead magnet, this time from a lawyer.



And another legal example of a lead magnet at play.



Executive Placement Firm


Lead magnets exist in all industries, especially B2B. I’ve written white papers for executive placement firms and have found that their preferred lead magnet is the white paper or special report. Here’s an example of a special report (“guide”) from Parker-Lynch.



Copywriter


Here ‘s an example of a copywriter using a lead magnet. (For some reason, finding copywriting lead magnet examples was difficult.) Here’s one from copywriter Abbey Woodcock.




Marketing Agency


Here are a few of the lead magnets we’re using as of the time of this writing. You’ll notice that each is designed to solve a specific problem or answer a specific question or provide a specific set of information. And each requires exchanging information (e.g., an email address) to get the resource.





Each of the lead magnets posted above lead to an opt-in form, which puts the prospect on an email list or into a prospect database. From there, prospects should be followed up with by email, if not also by mail and phone. Of course, reports, e-books, and white papers aren’t the only type of lead magnet. There are at least 18 different types to choose from.


18 Types of Lead Magnets


There are at least eighteen different types of lead magnets you as a business owner can test to grow your database of warm, qualified leads.


Ebook


An ebook is a digital version of a printed book, oftentimes created to be digital-only. Ebooks serve to make great front-end lead generators, because they offer significant value to prospects who want to learn more while also positioning the author as an “expert”. Make sure you follow up with prospects who download or purchase your ebook.


Print Book


Print books are another, more traditional type of lead magnet. Print books work well with the “free + shipping” funnel model. As with the ebook, make sure you follow up by mail and email with your prospects.


Special Report or Guide


A special report is a written lead magnet which is information yet sales-focused. For example, a copywriter might publish a lead magnet addressing the “5 Myths of Email Marketing”. This guide should reframe a prospect’s understanding of a situation, and then “sell” the prospect on the solution. Special reports are written in both the B2B and B2C space, however are not as respected in some circles as the white paper is.


White Paper


A white paper is a written lead magnet most often used in the B2B space. A white paper is generally 7 to 20 pages in length and features a set structure, such as executive summary, problem statement, solution statement, body, conclusion, and call to action. White papers are generally “information first”, rather than sales-focused. White papers should be as impartial as possible and cite references. White papers work well as front-end lead generation tools. 


Webinar


A webinar is a type of video-based sales presentation that generally lasts between 45 and 90 minutes. According to Digital Marketer, webinars are “middle of funnel” lead nurturing tools, rather than “top of funnel” front-end lead generation tools. Webinars are also often delivered automatically as an “evergreen” webinar.


Masterclass


A masterclass is a type of webinar, often longer in length, such as a “3 hour masterclass” that teaches a process more in-depth. Often, the masterclass has less sales elements than a traditional webinar. I’ve seen Masterclass funnels used effectively as part of LinkedIn prospecting. 


Shock and Awe Package


A “shock and awe package” is something I first learned about from Dan Kennedy of “GKIC” fame. A “shock and awe” package is a direct mail package you send to prospects when they requires more information from you – such a s a report plus a book, newsletter, and special report. Or some other group of gifts that pique their interest and encourage them to respond. 


Quiz or Survey


The survey/quiz is more popular than ever thanks to Ryan Levesque’s popular “Ask Method” program.  His method,


“[T]urns passive readers into active participants – and is a powerful way to get your prospective customers to provide information so you can:
1. Pre-qualify every user who takes your quiz as a lead based on how they answer.
2. Ask certain questions to find out key buying signals.
3. Put each lead into special buckets and receive custom messages.

https://www.riddle.com/blog/ryan-levesque-ask-method-quiz-creator/


Surveys are a great way to encourage engagement while also getting valuable information from your prospects you can use to group your prospects. That way, you can create targeted messaging and offers that will appeal specifically to the different segments.


Checklist


love checklists as lead magnets. They’re easy to consume, provide actionable value, and encourage implementation of information. They’re also very easy to create. Checklists are useful for consultants and best placed as a CTA to blog posts or as a giveaway in a webinar. Here’s an example from the Indiana Direct Response Marketing site and from LynnSwayze.com:



Cheat Sheet / Infographic


If you can’t figure out what to offer at the end of a blog post to transform it into a mini-funnel, you can always create cheat sheets and infographics of the content. This gives people an opportunity to download and save the information in a usable format. Obviously, make sure there’s a call to action to take the next step and follow up with prospects several times by email.  Here’s a great example from Pat Flynn:



Audio Interview


One of the less commonly used lead magnets (at least anymore) is an audio download. I’ve seen audio downloads (or CDs, or MP3s, or transcripts) most often in the form of an interview. So a consultant will interview another expert (ideally, one the prospect respects) and offers it as a lead magnet in exchange for opting in to an email list. 


Free Sample


Free samples are another example of a lead magnet. Free samples are most commonly used in ecommerce businesses to boost retail sales. For best results, follow up with prospects after they’ve tried the sample you send them. 


Free Trial 


Yes, the “free trial” IS an example of a lead magnet. Free trials are used to sell SAAS subscriptions, membership sites, magazine subscriptions, and membership programs to generate more sales and identify potential buyers. Trial lengths last anywhere from a certain number of sessions to weeks and often require registration or an exchange of information, including credit card information.   


Email Mini-Course


This lead magnet type combines the educational value of a course with emails, giving you a foot in the door in people’s inboxes. For best results, keep the course at less than 5 lessons and deliver them anywhere from once a day to once a week, and feature a call to action at the end which sells your core product or service. Here’s an example of a mini course based on email marketing from https://ariel-lim.com/ .


Example from https://ariel-lim.com/ 


Free Newsletter


An uncommon yet effective lead magnet is the free newsletter. This can be mailed to prospects for less than $10/year and work well to generate leads and referrals. Or you can offer a paid newsletter, as we have. To learn more about newsletters and how to write effective print newsletters, check out Shaun Buck’s “Newsletter Pro” book.


Catalog or Price Guide


Another type of lead magnet is the catalog or price guide. Catalogs can be printed or digital, however usually require the prospect to exchange their personal information in exchange for the catalog. B2B businesses would benefit from a price guide, especially if many prospects call asking for a quote. This allows you to build a database of qualified leads your sales team can then follow up on. When you build these, make sure you have special offers and a call to action built in. 


Coupon


As you saw above with the-shirt.com, a coupon is another great lead magnet idea, especially if you’re in the e-commerce and retail space. You can either offer a specific percentage off or a specific dollar amount. Some utilize an app that “randomizes” the special offer, which adds a touch of “gamification” to the whole process.


Case Study


The final type of lead magnet you can try is a downloadable case study. A “case study” is basically a long client testimonial written in a story-based format. To do it well, you’ll want to highlight your clients’ struggles before working with you, their experience working with you during their project, and then their after results. Use images, quotes, and quantifiable data when possible. Here’s an example of a downloadable case study from PAYJO.



How to Position a Lead Magnet


If you download my Lead Magnet Checklist, you’ll see a section which asks you about the positioning of our lead magnet. The positioning is simply how you approach the lead magnet and the qualities the lead magnet has. 


A great lead magnet, at least in my mind,  has the following characteristics: 


  • It solves a single, specific problem the prospect has
  • It provides a single, specific solution to the problem
  • It contains a benefit-driven title (obviously, indicating the problem previously mentioned)
  • It looks professionally produced, so as to be more trusted and respected by your ideal prospect
  • It has a built-in consumption mechanism, that lets prospects immediately implement what they’re learning from you
  • It has a call to action to the next step or upsell 
  • It logically correlates with your core offer


When I see lead magnets fail, they either miss one of these core components OR they lack fully optimized lead magnet marketing assets, which you’ll see in the next section.


Lead Magnet Marketing Assets


When I work with clients, they’re often surprised I can come in and rattle of 5, 10, or even 20 copywriting assets which need to be built for a marketing campaign. I want to reveal those assets right now, so you’ll never be surprised when a marketing consultant does this for you. 


A good lead magnet campaign contains all of the following marketing assets:


  • An Advertising Mechanism (FB Ads, email to your list, banner ad, etc)
  • An Ordering Mechanism (lead magnet opt-in page, squeeze page, form, etc)
  • A Delivery Mechanism (e.g., download page, download email)
  • Stick Letter to Frame the Delivery (lift note, download email)
  • Ongoing Marketing (follow-up emails, letters, messages)
  • Retargeting Mechanism for those who don’t opt in (retargeting ads, etc)
  • Follow-up Tripwire or Core Offer (upsell offer, call to action)
  • Ongoing Marketing for different offers (keep marketing!)


If you’re looking for a way to get more sales and grow your business, or if current marketing efforts are growing stale, then it’s probably time to try a new lead magnet. If you already have a written lead magnet, try a different modality (such as video or audio). Or if you have a video lead magnet, try adding in something written. And if you want help, don’t hesitate to get in touch.


Lynn’s “Lead Magnet Checklist”


Checklist


I’ve created a FREE lead magnet checklist to help you make sure you have all the pieces required to create an irresistible lead magnet to grow your email list and provide value to prospects.


It’s yours FREE – simply sign up here to claim your copy.

Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

The "Tripwire Offer": What it is, why it matters, and is it right for you

views
25

This is part 1 of an ongoing series called “Marketing 101”. In this series, we’ll discuss common direct response marketing lingo and break it down so it actually makes sense. In today’s article we’ll discuss “tripwire offers 101”, or the basics of using a tripwire offer in your marketing funnel.


The Birth of the Tripwire


The term “tripwire” appears to have originated with Ryan Deiss of Digital Marketer. I have to admit, I am not at all in love with the negative terminology that seems rampant in online marketing these days. “Tripwire” seems negative. I prefer the original term, front-end offer, which you’ll hear from me most often when I talk about “top of funnel (TOFU)” campaigns.


(Some also like to use the term “welcome mat”.)


What is a Tripwire Offer?


A “tripwire offer” (aka, a front-end offer) is a lower-cost entry offer which is presented to prospects early in the marketing campaign. Note that I say “lower cost” very deliberately, because low cost compared to a $199 core offer is chump change compared to the low cost alternative to a $10,000 core offer. (And by core offer, I mean the main product or service you’re selling.)


In the days of direct mail, this was the offer presented on first mailing. In online marketing, this is a chunk of your core offer broken down into a piece that’s easily consumable for the prospect yet costs something more than free


I’ve seen tripwires (or “front end offers”) as:


  • $1, $3.95, $9.95, or even $19 trial of a software or membership
  • $27 Execution Plan (see below!)
  • $497 Webinar “Masterclass” (the full product was $15,000!)
  • $7 Book (or “Free + Shipping”)
  • 7 books for $1, 10 CDs for $1, etc. 
  • $99 “Special Report” 
  • $37 annual newsletter
  • Buy 1, Get 1 Free Product Offer on something small 


These examples should be enough to grease the wheels of your imagination about what’s possible for your business. Now let’s look at a few examples of front-end marketing offers.  


What are Tripwire Marketing Examples?


I’m glad you asked! Below is a direct response publisher, Nutrition and Healing, offers a newsletter + FREE BOOK as their front-end “tripwire” offer, which you’ll see below:



I highlighted the second option because, as you’ll see, the first option isn’t really an option when you consider that their target demographic is over 55. So this is technically a “tripwire” offer at a mere $37 per year. 


Here’s another example, this time from Ryan Deiss of Digital Marketer:



I highlighted the low cost, here $27. Their goal is to get you to join their core offer, Digital Marketer Lab, so they’re making that look appealing by placing the “free trial” against the “$27 Execution Plan”. Either way, someone new to Digital Marketer may try the low commitment $27 plan as a way to test the value of the products offered. 


Here’s another, this time by “RightMixMarketing” in their sidebar. It leads to their $19.99 blogging course, on sale for just $10.



Hopefully, you’ll see now that a “tripwire offer” has the following characteristics:


  1. It appears early in the marketing cycle. 
  2. Is low cost compared to the core offer, but NOT free.
  3. Gives prospects a “taste” of what working with you is like. 
  4. Is easy to purchase (requires no application or sales call).
  5. Is highly benefit-driven and designed to solve a single problem
  6. Is easy and quick to consume by the prospect.
  7. Is often “DIY” instead of “DWY” or “DFY”. 


The Tripwire Offer Controversy


There’s some debate as to whether a low cost tripwire offer is even needed. Some high ticket marketers insist the only way to sell is to start with the big core offer and then downsell until someone buys, rather than start with the low cost and work upwards. 


According to Todd Brown of Marketing Funnel Automation, a tripwire gets the buyer psychology all wrong, at least if you’re in information marketing. He says, 


“…most of the highly successful internet marketers start with a high-priced offer. Something in the range of $200 to $500. What this does is it gets the “cream of the top”, so to speak. There is a certain percentage of people who are going to take advantage of the higher offer like that.Then we create a frame of value around the product for those who don’t jump in right away.”

– Todd Brown, “Why you DON’T want to start your funnel with a tripwire”


He explains that the best course of action is to start with the $200, $500, or $1000 offer, because the best prospects will bite right away. Then, he says that those who don’t bite will take payment options. Those who don’t take that offer might take a streamlined version of the product for a lowered price. And those who still say no might invest in a tripwire offer. He believes this approach better anchors your “value” in the mind of the prospect than a traditional “moving up the ladder” marketing funnel approach. 


One point to keep in mind is that not all businesses would benefit from a tripwire. High ticket consulting businesses, such as those in the Information Technology space, likely can’t offer a tripwire. 


Or can they


An example of using a tripwire in this space could be a paid evaluation or consultation. Or perhaps a training for their team. Either way, these options are likely to cost less than the hundreds of thousands some IT projects cost. 


In the e-commerce space, tripwires which work well are free gifts, such as a sample set of perfumes. I’ve even seen “matchbooks” of lipstick samples as a tripwire offer!  


What Happens if There Isn’t a Tripwire Offer in a Marketing Funnel?


Look, I’m not going to claim that the sky’s going to fall if you don’t include a tripwire offer in your marketing. However, not including a tripwire offer where one would be beneficial will, at the very least, cause you to leave money on the table. 


That’s because you always want to have an offer for everyone. Not everyone will buy at your highest tier; nor will everyone buy at your lowest tier. Allow your clients to choose the level of quality, service, and DIY they prefer at the price point they can afford. Not giving these options may mean that you’re turning away paying clients who would invest if only you gave them the opportunity! 


How to Create a Tripwire Offer Funnel


By now, you should already have some idea of what to create for your tripwire offer. If not, here are some front-end marketing offers you can swipe today:


  1. Ebook or Book
  2. Webinar or “Masterclass” 
  3. Cheatsheet, Checklist, or Workshop 
  4. Low-cost Trial (e.g., $1) 
  5. Miniature Course
  6. Short Consultation Call
  7. Free Product or “Buy one, et one free”
  8. Product Sample for low price 


Pick a tripwire type and then ask yourself, “Which urgent problem am I hoping to solve with this tripwire?” 


In one of the examples above, it’s finding natural cures to difficult health problems. In another, it was how to grow a business using a blog. Pick a problem your clients ask to solve most often. 


Then, ask yourself, “What is the most powerful benefit of consuming and implementing this tripwire?”


Now you know what to create, which problem to solve, and the big idea of your opt-in marketing copy. Go at it! 


Note that you’ll need to create all of the following to successfully launch your tripwire:


  • Image of the Tripwire (I like to make 3D images)
  • Tripwire Offer Squeeze Page
  • The Tripwire (Marketing Asset) itself
  • Purchase ability (e.g., button which goes to a cart)
  • Delivery Mechanism (e.g., email delivery, course login)
  • Follow-up Sequence and Offer (e.g., core offer)


And of course, if you want help with this, you’re more than welcome to get my help on your next marketing campaign.


How Much to Charge for a Tripwire


Traditionally tripwires cost less than $50. That being said, I’ve seen them cost as little as $1 and as much as $99. The choice is  up to you, and I urge you to test your price as much as you test everything else in your marketing. 


Tripwires can be useful tools to grow your list and add revenue to your business. Many entrepreneurs use them to give prospects an opportunity to “test drive” before purchasing a bigger product. If your business supports it, then you would do well to test tripwires. I wonder who you’ll prove right – Ryan Deiss of Digital Marketer or Todd Brown of Marketing Funnel Automation? 


Would you like to discover even more ways to optimize your marketing using proven direct response strategies? You can with our FREE white paper. Claim your copy today.


Feel free to leave your “tripwire” opinions below. What did we get right? What did we get wrong? Let us know in the comments below!

Articles by Lynn SwayzeCopywritingMarketing Funnels

Direct Response Marketing: Advantages and Disadvantages

views
25

Could direct response marketing be the answer to your business growth problems? In part 2 of the “Ultimate Guide to Direct Response” series, we take a look at the advantages and disadvantages of direct response marketing for small businesses. Click here for Part 1.


Direct response marketing is the success secret fueling almost every successful speaker, coach, “guru”, and businessman today who makes his living selling directly to consumers. Tony Robbins? He’s a direct response marketer. Brian Tracy? Also direct response marketer. Timothy Ferris? You guessed it – he’s a direct response man. For centuries, brands have relied on direct response marketing and direct response copywriting to fuel the business.


While I could go on and on about the advantages of direct response marketing, that wouldn’t help you — the business owner — gauge its true worth to you to test. That’s why in this post I’ll break down the honest advantages and disadvantages of using direct response marketing strategies. 


Let’s start with the disadvantages first. 


The Disadvantages of Direct Response Marketing


There are a few disadvantages to direct response marketing. These disadvantages fall under four categories: effort, efficiency, expense, and ego. 


Effort


One reason many entrepreneurs do not undertake direct response marketing is that there is a great deal of effort required to do it right. A good direct response copywriter will ask to research for weeks, if not months, before beginning marketing creation. That’s because in order to do the job right and get stellar results, the marketer has to crack open the buyer’s mind and pull out the juicy desires, objections, and emotions. Only then can effective marketing be written. 


Another source of effort? The tracking. Direct response marketing insists on being accountable, and accountability requires diligent tracking. Direct response marketers track the cost per lead, the open rates, the click through rates, the response rates, and many other metrics in between. Planning the data collection, managing the data, and then reviewing the data takes time away from other operations tasks. 


Efficiency


The next “problem” with direct response marketing is the speed of execution. A full direct response marketing plan may have over 150 separate marketing assets. If you want to just “wing it” and run with whatever comes into your head, then direct response marketing methods are going to feel a bit disappointing. (Mostly because tracking marketing which fails kind of sucks.)


Expense


Another complaint of direct response marketing? It’s expensive! Compared to the cost of simply slapping up a website and posting on Facebook a few times a week, direct response can feel expensive at first. For example, Facebook ads will run you at least $10 per day, if not hundreds. Same for Google pay-per-click (PPC) advertising. And direct mail will cost at least $1 per name once you count printing and postage costs. And none of that includes the cost of the copywriter tasked with writing your converting direct response campaign. 


Ego


Another problem with direct response? It doesn’t care about your ego. Many businesses want to run pretty yet narcissistic marketing messages like “We’ve been in business for 34 years” or other trite messaging. This type of messaging doesn’t actually work, yet it feels good to run it. Businesses with a lot of ego tend to pick more “branding” oriented marketing methods, which cater to feeling good and not rocking the buyer emotion boat. 


The Advantages of Direct Response Marketing


Now, it’s time to look at the advantages of direct response marketing. There are quite a few, otherwise we wouldn’t be in the business of direct response here at Indiana Direct Response Marketing (IDRM). They are accountable, effective, and long-lasting. 


Accountable


First and foremost, direct response marketing is, if nothing else, accountable. Direct response marketers insist on marketing  campaigns and copy being held to the standard of DATA. Not gut feelings, not whims, not trends, but quantifiable and irrefutable data. How do we know if a big idea or an approach will work? We test! How do we know if a new approach will beat the existing control? We test! We test and measure until your marketing is optimized for response and effectiveness. And at the end of the day, we tie results to the long-term revenue you gain. Period.


Effective


This extreme focus on accountability and results generally means that what is done is actually effective and moving the needle and keeping you in the black. A direct response marketer is a bit like a salesman: a salesperson who can’t close eventually finds himself out of work. The same is true of us: if we can consistently generate leads and revenues for our clients, then we work. If we can’t, we have to hang up our hat. It’s just that simple. 


Long-Lasting


Finally, because direct response marketing is based on data and must actually generate more leads and more revenue for the business, then it often happens that a business will finally create a marketing asset (such as a webinar, direct mail series, or sales page) which lasts for a bit of time. Unlike social media, which must always be new and fresh, direct response marketing funnels could last years. In the early part of the century, there were newspaper ads which lasted decades. Which means that paying for direct response copywriting once could mean years of profit at no extra cost.


At IDRM, we believe the benefits of direct response outweigh the costs. However, only you can decide for yourself. To discover more profit-boosting tips, download our “5 Strategies” white paper today. 


What do you think? Did I miss an advantage or disadvantage? Let me know in the comments below. 



Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

Three Ways to Exponentially Grow Your Business

views
21

I first learned about the energy-saving power of levers when I worked as a crew member at Trader Joe’s.


Part of the job required lifting heavy “lugs” (or crates) of frozen food from the backroom freezer to the freezer area, and then take them back once the public-facing freezer had been stocked. It was heavy, heavy work I was ill-prepared to do well. Most of that wasn’t my fault, honestly, given that I’m a mere 4’10.5″ in height – smaller than most 12 year-olds. 


Thank heavens I had a tool to help make the job easier.


You see, every crew member had training on how to use a mover’s dolly to carry heavy items – boxes, frozen lugs, and more – easily and safely. Many of these stacks weighed several times more than me, yet I was able to carry them around the store with relative ease thanks to this ingenious tool.


Fortunately, you can apply that same effort-saving power to your marketing.


Unfortunately, so many business owners think that in order to make more money, they need to increase their number of clients dramatically. While this is one way to grow a business, it’s not the only way

According to Richard Johnson of the “Hidden Marketing Assets (HMA)” Program (of which I am a paid member), there are three ways to grow your business. These three ways act like levers on your business growth, allowing you to exponentially increase your business revenue without doing a large amount of work. (Note that Richard claims learned these three “growth mechanisms” from the great Jay Abraham, of whom he was a protege… which means you can bet that they work!) 


So what are these three levers? They are to increase the number of leads your business has, increase the conversion rate of leads to clients, and increase the average value of each client.


The resulting formula looks like this:



What this formula means for you is that your current revenue is a mix of the number of leads you have, your conversion rate, and your average customer value. Increasing any one of these just a little could increase your business by 10%… 25%… even 33% in a very short period of time. Let’s see how that looks in more detail.


More Leads


The first growth lever is to increase the number of leads your business sees. Whether you’re tracking it or not, your business has a certain number of prospects already in your database and adds a certain number each and every month. (Even if that number is, currently, zero.) This number is your starting point. 


For the sake of easy math, let’s keep the example simple. Let’s say you’re running a basic consulting business serving beginning entrepreneurs. You add 150 new prospects to your database per month and close 5 of those thanks to your steady 3.3% conversion rate. Each of those new clients is worth $1,000 in revenue per month to you. The result is a $60,000 in new business per year.


All else staying the same, let’s say you’re able to maintain your current conversion rate and average value while you increase your number of new leads per month thanks to a new white paper campaign. This time, you get 250 new leads per month, convert 3.3% at $1,000 each. The result of this change gives you 8 clients per month and $96,000 in business per year. 


Easy enough, right? Let’s look at the next lever, your conversion rate.


Higher Conversion Rate


The second growth lever in your business is your conversion rate. So let’s say that you start with that original consulting business serving beginning entrepreneurs. You pull in 150 new prospects to your database per month and close 5 of those thanks to your steady 3.3% conversion rate. Each of those new clients is worth $1,000 in revenue per month to you. The result is a $60,000 in new business per year.


Now let’s say that you increased your conversion rates. Say you tried a new email sequence that did a better job of indoctrinating. Or perhaps your sales team followed up a few more times. Whatever it is, let’s say that you were able to bump up the conversions of prospects to clients to 7%, giving you 10 sales instead of 5. And at $1,000 each, that’s $5,000 more in your pocket every month than you had before.


But what if you increased both the number of leads and the conversion rate? So now you have 250 leads converting at the more effective 7%… giving you 17 sales at $1,000 each, or $17,000 per month (that’s $204,000 annually compared to your previous $60,000). 


Now, let’s crank that ratchet even more


Increased Value Per Client


The final lever you can pull is the value per client. Let’s say that you have the original 150 leads and 3.3% conversion rate, for a total of 5 sales per month at $1,000 per new client. Let’s say that now, instead of getting $1,000 per client, you increase the value you deliver so that you can raise the price per client to $1,500. With everything else the same, you now earn $30,000 more per year than you did before.


But what if you changed all three? So now you have the increased 250 leads per month, becoming clients at the new 7% conversion rate, for $1,500 per new client. The result of these three minor tweaks is a cool $25,500 per month, an over 400% increase. All by making small shifts in key areas of your business.


That’s the power of the three growth levers at play in your business. And this is just a drop in the bucket compared to what you can do if you really know how to optimize leads, conversion rates, and average customer value. 


And as long as you remember that growth can often come from small changes made at regular intervals, rather than big leaps all at once, you’ll do well. This is a core tenant of direct response marketing, and one you would do well to add to your mindset like a feather in your cap.


With that in mind, I’d like to offer you a free worksheet: “Business Growth Optimization”. In it, you’ll get spaces for calculating the effects growth in each of these three areas could have on your business. You’ll also get some tips for increasing each of the three. It’s yours free- simply click here to request your copy.

Articles by Lynn SwayzeMarketing Funnels

Direct Response Marketing 101

views
18

“What is Direct Response Marketing?”


Given that I run a business called, “Indiana Direct Response Marketing”, I figure that it’s high time we actually define what in the heck direct response marketing actually is.


I live and breathe direct response marketing. It works, it holds everyone accountable, and it actually recoups the investment when done right. Which is why I’m such a big believer in and advocate for direct response marketing strategies and tactics.


So the question is – what is direct response marketing?


Here’s a video by David Ogilvy which I love:





… On second thought, perhaps it’s best to start by explaining what direct response isn’t. Because like it or not, all marketing is not direct response marketing. That doesn’t mean that all marketing is bad, it simply means that not all marketing shares the same goals or success metrics.


What is Indirect Marketing?


Logically, the opposite of direct response marketing would be “indirect response marketing.” That’s marketing that doesn’t directly ask for the response or action of the consumer and which doesn’t have a way to track campaign metrics to sales results.


I’m talking things like….


  • Website redesign
  • Educational emails that don’t ask for action
  • Brochures and “brand” marketing
  • Advertisements with no specific call to action


Here, I am reminded of the time I once spoke with an SEO expert.


It was in 2017-ish and I lived in Bloomington, Indiana. The guy seemed bright and friendly, and obviously knew his stuff when it came to search engine optimization.


Buuuuuuut when I asked him about tying results to marketing spend, he froze like a deer in headlights. He seemed generally perplexed that anyone could tie marketing spend to revenues, much less that someone (e.g., me) would make an entire business out of it.


Let’s just say that the conversation kind of ended after that.


Unfortunately, there are many entrepreneurs who spend a lot of money to not see results out of their marketing investment. More than a few well-meaning business owners have been swindled out of thousands of dollars only to get a few hundred “likes” and a couple thousand “views”… when they could have used that money to create real, measurable, and accountable results.


Sometimes, indirect marketing is used to bolster the image of a company. For example, the Super Bowl Ads you see every year are a great example. Companies will spend millions upon millions of dollars to air a short commercial…


… and have no way to directly tie that exorbitant ad spend to increased revenues.


Another example is advertising which doesn’t immediately ask for action. Billboards with a generic URL or phone number is one common example of this lack of immediacy.


To recap, we can say that indirect marketing :


  • Is not easily tied to the sales cycle
  • Does not ask for a response immediately
  • Does not have a “Call to Action”
  • Is more concerned about overall image/reputation
  • Cannot be expected to have an ROI


Here are some types of marketing which aren’t direct response, at least not by themselves. (I’ll share in a moment how to tie direct response elements into almost all of these.)


Types of “Indirect Marketing”


Website Rebranding


Website rebranding is, for whatever reason, one of the first steps businesses make when they want to start marketing. I’m guessing it’s because most believe that a classier website will automatically translate to more sales.


Search Engine Optimization


Search engine optimization makes you more “findable” by search engine. This is important, because being found online is everything anymore. If you aren’t online, you don’t exist! Of course, you can get all the traffic you want and still not make the sale. Which is why most businesses try the following…


Content Marketing


Blogging and article writing is often the next thing businesses try. Content marketing uses blog posts to educate and “pre-sell” the prospect. Often, these articles are written around core “seed keywords” businesses want to rank for. Although again, you can have a lot of views and shares and still not grow your database of prospects or buyers.


Social Media Marketing


Social media marketing is another avenue many small businesses take to try to get more sales. Unfortunately, social media marketing can be one of the biggest time wasters out there. That’s because most of the time, it’s not tied to a funnel of any kind.


Email Marketing


Finally, some businesses owners try email marketing. Email marketing is marketing which does most of the selling via email campaigns, either through regular broadcast emails or automated email campaigns. More often than not, small business owners use it as a platform to brag on themselves rather than as a means to sell.


Each of these are good actions to take, but none by themselves qualify as direct response marketing.


To make each of these “direct response marketing”, all you need to do is add a call to action at the end which you can track.


So a blog post would have a call to action to get into the funnel. (Perhaps with a worksheet or checklist of the blog post, for example, available as an opt-in to your email list)


The social media would have a CTA to a front-end offer… and if not, the blog post would have the CTA to the front-end offer. Your site should always have advertisements to take the next step, whether that be book a call, answer a quiz, download a lead magnet, or purchase a relevant tripwire. And for emails, the same thing applies in that you should always be selling the action you want the prospect to take.


As for the website rebrand, the best thing you can do is create a case study for the company which did your branding and then make them point that “success story” back to your site – of course using Google tagging so you can track by referral source. (Ka-ching! Free traffic you can track!)


See how that works?


And when you make everything you do work for you in this way, you can actually track the efficacy of all your marketing efforts. (More on that below.)


The Definition of Direct Response Marketing


In my mind, direct response marketing is the type of marketing which requires immediate action directly from the consumer. Whether that action come in the form of filling out a reply card, calling a specific number, requesting a lead magnet online, or signing up for a special package on the spot, there’s an action the marketing piece requires the consumer to take (or not!). And it’s that action, or lack thereof, which gets tracked.


Direct response marketing is often found in:


  • Email campaigns with a call to action at the end
  • Landing Pages with a front-end lead magnet
  • Marketing funnels with upsells and downsells
  • Direct mail sales letters with a special offer
  • Postcards with a call to action on them
  • LinkedIn messages with a proposed next step
  • Video sales letters (VSLs), webinars, and YouTube videos with a CTA
  • Space ads with a unique number to call


… And much, much more.


As you can see, direct response marketing is found in online platforms and offline platforms. It’s been used for over one hundred years to generate more sales and increased revenues for businesses of all sizes.


Direct response marketing is responsible for creating success for brands and products you may be familiar with, such as:


  • L.L. Bean
  • Proctor and Gamble
  • Harlequin Books
  • Duluth Trading Company
  • “Blue Blocker” Sunglasses


And because the response is immediate and measurable, it’s super attractive to most business owners who need a quick return on investment.


Direct Response Marketing Example


For example, let’s say that between the copywriter, the list rental, the postage, and the production that running a piece of direct mail to a list of 10,000 names cost you $25,000. But let’s say that of those 10,000, a good 100 respond and spend $597 on your offer. Congratulations! You have a 1% response rate and earned a whopping $59,700 for your $25,000 spend, netting you $34,700.


Now let’s say you follow up with those who didn’t spend by sending a series of 5 letters, each one selling the benefits, proof, guarantees, etc. By the end of that sequence (which you already paid for up-front), you’ll have earned another 75 buyers and $44,775 dollars.


Not bad, eh?


And when it’s time to run the campaign with a new list (which you’ll do, because you’re savvy like that), you have three options:


  1. Run the same campaign with a new list.
  2. Split the list in two, with half running the “control” campaign you just ran and half running a new campaign you want to test.
  3. Run a completely new campaign with a new list


Doing this sort of tracking and testing is the hallmark of direct response marketing and direct response advertising. It’s what direct response copywriters (like me) are trained to do!


As you can imagine, we “direct response copywriters” can apply this same testing methodology to all sorts of media:


  • Space ads in magazines or newspapers
  • Display advertising in websites
  • Facebook, Google PPC, LinkedIn, etc ads
  • Marketing Funnels (Clickfunnels, Leadpages, etc)
  • Webinars and VSLs
  • Email campaigns
  • And so many more…


Which is why a good direct response marketer can make you so much more than you ever pay out to them IF you hire the right one and are willing to test, test, and test some more.


How We Do It


There are a few ways direct response copywriters get people to respond to your marketing.


Attention-Grabbing Headlines


In order to grab the reader’s immediate attention, we use headlines that “jolt” and “jar” the reader out of their somnolence and into whatever it is we want them to see. And then we keep them glued until they either opt out of reading more, or end up buying. John Carlton calls it the “greased slide”, and it works well to increase your bottom line.


Laser-Targeted Focus


Direct response works because it’s laser focused. That is, we write copy for a specific avatar with a specific problem that can only be solved with a specific product – yours! It’s this laser targeting in avatar, language, and pain points that makes what we do so successful.


Benefit-Driven, Emotionally-Charged Copy


Another way direct response copywriters get the sale is by using benefit-driven, emotionally charged copy. We understand that people buy on emotion and justify with facts, which is why we use emotional language and reasoning in our marketing messages.


Short-Term Follow-Ups


Campaign success depends on short-term follow-ups requesting immediate action. It’s this measuring of “immediate action” that tells us whether the marketing campaign worked or not!


Long-term Follow-ups


We understand that not everyone is going to buy on the first go-round. Which is why a good direct response copywriter will help you plan a long-term campaign to nurture your prospect and buyer database. That way, you continue to be “top of mind” in the eyes of your prospects.


Want some help?


And if you’d like some help with creating accountable marketing campaigns, simply book a call with my team. We can talk one-on-one about your business and campaigns and see if we can inject a little direct response into it. If not, no worries – the call is free of charge.


Hopefully, this has given you a little bit better idea about what direct response marketing is all about. In Part 2 of the series I’ll share the benefits and drawbacks of direct response marketing.When you’re ready to see how direct response marketing can help you get more leads and increase your conversion rate, then feel free to book a no-cost discovery call with us today.


___________


Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Five Common Consultant Website Problems

views
65

TL;DR: Over the course of this article I’m going to describe the most common website flaws for consultants. There are many (including some that yours truly engages in), but these are the most likely to harm your long-term profitability. These are: a lack of an about page, no email list, no lead magnet, blogging for the wrong audience, and no selling. Read on to get the full scoop.


Table of Contents:
I. Why do I need a website?
II. Common mistake 1: No About Page
III. Common Mistake 2: No Email List
IV. Common Mistake 3: No Lead Magnet
V. Common Mistake 4: Blogging for the wrong audience
VI. Common Mistake 5: Not Selling
VII. Conclusion & Resources


Why do I need a website?

What’s the purpose of a website for consultants?

  • Is it to help with Google search results?
  • Is it to generate leads?
  • Is it to sell your products/services?
  • Is it to showcase your expertise in your field via media (articles, video, audio)?
  • Is it to link to your social media?

If you answered all of the above, you’re right!
And if you struggle with your website, you’re not alone. And also, I want to tell you right now that it’s not your fault. Website creation is purposely made complicated by designers, web devs, and people who make their living selling websites. If they made it sound easy, they’d be out of a job. So if you have in your head that you need to spend $10,000 in order to put up a blog, then you can blame them.
Should you spend some money in quality graphics? Absolutely. Is it necessary when you as a consultant aren’t profitable yet? No. it’s not. Spend money on other things like ads, direct mail, etc., but not on your website. Not at first.
Think of your website as your marketing real estate. It’s the one corner on the internet that you own. It’ll be yours no matter what social media platform is popular or how big you get. It will grow in usefulness the longer it remains in effect. And all of the information on the site is under your control. The layout, the content, the pages, the design. All of it.
Over the course of this article I’m going to describe the most common website flaws for consultants. There are many (including some that yours truly engages in), but these are the most likely to harm your long-term profitability.

Common mistake 1: No About Page

The most common mistake that I see is a lack of an about page or an ineffective about page. Your about page is the one part of your site where you can really talk about yourself. You want to tell your story and through the narrative answer the following questions:
Who are you?
I mean the real you, not your “business persona” version of you. As a tech consultant, do you have a degree in networking, or did you come from a liberal arts background? As a copywriter – did you start off in a different field altogether? What makes you uniquely qualified to do your job?
What do you do/sell?
What do you sell? Do you sell products, like books and courses? Do you sell services, like monthly retainer consulting about something specific? Why do you sell what you do, and not something else?
How do you help your customers?
Here’s an example I came up with on the fly just now for this blog post based on the “60 Second Sales Hook”, a template created by  copywriting mentor Kevin Rogers:
“Hi, I’m Lynn Swayze. I’m an independent copywriter based out of Charleston, Illinois.
For years I watched businesses I worked for struggle to make sales and generate leads. It seemed like everyone had the same problem: they spent entirely too much in advertising, got too few results, and ended up with clients that weren’t a good fit for their services. I knew that their had to be a better way for B2B companies to sell more of their products and services.
In my searching I discovered direct response copywriting. It was the piece that companies were missing! After spending thousands in training from the industry’s top copywriters and internet marketers, reading dozens of books, and hundreds of hours spent reading and hand copying time-tested ads, I learned what worked and what didn’t for B2B companies. 
Now I spend my time helping others apply time-tested marketing and copywriting techniques in their business. I write landing pages and website content, develop marketing funnels, and create lead magnets for companies of all sizes.
If you’re interested to see how I can help you, opt in to my waiting list and then HIT REPLY to the email you’re sent. Or, send me an email at lynn (at) lynnswayze.com and let’s get started.”
See… it’s not so hard! The hard part is opening up in the first place. Note that my about page example as a call to action that isn’t some version of “contact me”. It offers a low-threshold way for people to get more information without directly contacting me.

Common Mistake 2: No Email List

Okay my tech consultants out there… this is probably your #1 problem. You hate spam and so instead of using email to foster conversations and build relationships with your prospects, you avoid it altogether. And you don’t sell. No one uses your “contact me” form. And there is no direct link between website visitors and sales because you didn’t build one.
Mantra: Your website = lead generation tool
Let me ask you really quick…. how many leads does your website generate? If you’re like many consultants, it’s well under 500 total. For one of my best clients, the answer was ZERO. So, let’s say that your website receives 200 views a month. How many of those views translate into prospects, let alone customers? You need to get this number to at least 3%, if not 10%. Ten would be awesome for most consultants. How do you do this? Well, you get a list.
Think of your email list as your future customer database. 
If you do it right, your email list is comprised of people who are your prospects. So, let’s say that you build a proper lead magnet (ebook, worksheet, white paper, etc) and it attracts your ideal client. Your ideal client wants the information and signs up. Now you have a list of individuals who have enough of a problem that they’re willing to exchange their email address for it. That’s a big deal!
Email doesn’t have to be spammy.
Now you can start to build a relationship with those clients. Show them your personality. Offer them value. And more importantly… you stay TOP OF MIND by emailing them at least weekly, if not daily. They won’t forget your name. When they think of a consultant who does what you do, who do you think they’ll think of? If they’re reading your emails every day, then they’ll think of you. They’ll forward your emails to friends. And they’ll refer you to others if they don’t hire you directly themselves. And when it is time to sell (a book you’ve launched, an opening on your waitlist, etc), it won’t come across as spammy because you’re now the friend who’s reaching out with something that’ll help them and not another cold emailing salesman.

FREE course -> “Charge What You’re Worth” by Brennan Dunn

I recommend Aweber  or Active Campaign for email management, but there are others that’ll do the job too, like Drip or ConvertKit or even Mailchimp. Note that you’ll need an @yourdomain.com email address instead of a public one like Google or Hotmail or Yahoo.

Common Mistake 3: No Lead Magnet

In order to get emails, you have to have a lead magnet. A good lead magnet can be used for PPC ads and for email signups on your page. A good lead magnet will provide value (just enough!) without giving away the whole farm. And it will help establish you as an authority in whatever it is you do/teach/sell.
TL;DR: You are offering something of value you have (information) in exchange for something of value they have (an email address/their information, their time). You are looking for those website visitors who raise their hand and are essentially saying, “Yes, I have this problem!” You are starting a conversation with potential prospects.

Common Mistake 4: Blogging for the wrong audience

Okay guys…. you know who you are. Those of you writing about the latest technical tool instead of about your customer’s needs. When you do the former, you are blogging to the wrong audience. So, let’s say that you lead magnet provides value to your ideal customer. Great. But if your blog posts (SEO magnets!) talk to your peers instead of to your prospects, do you think you’ll get opt-ins to your email list? No… no you won’t.
Talk to your prospects. Talk about how you’ve solved a client problem. Address a common question you get. But don’t talk about technical stuff no one but your peers care about. Save that content for where it matters – tech blogs and magazines where you can guest post. Your site should sell you.
Exception: if you want to sell books or training to your peers, then by all means blog about the technical, profession-related stuff. But in this case you’re still following the rule to blog to your customer, because your customer has changed. See where I’m going with this? 🙂

Here’s Jon Morrow’s secret for blogging success (from : https://smartblogger.com/stephen-king/):
“You want the formula for writing popular blog posts? Here it is: Jot down a list of blog topics you could write about. Circle the ones at least 80% of your readers would find irresistible. Write about those topics and nothing else.”

Common Mistake 5: Not Selling

This really goes back to mistake #1 and #2… many people hate selling. For some reason, it’s a big taboo to like selling. I don’t know why it is, but we all think of the sleazy car salesman when we talk about selling. It’s such a wrong mindset to have, though.
If your product or service actaully helps people, it is your OBLIGATION to sell them on it if they’re a good fit. (e.g., they can afford it and they’re ready for it). Why would you deny prospects the ability to grow their busines, improve their IT infrastructure, make more money, or whatever it is that your product does for them?
I think people get caught up in themselves and forget that they’re bringing value. They think, “No one would pay me $150 an hour to do this. I don’t know as much as [insert expert]!” Thing is, you know more than your prospects and clients and you will get them results. That’s what they’re paying for. Not for YOU, but for the RESULTS.
On your website, therefore, you have to sell. Make it easy for people to opt in to your list. If you sell a low-priced product (a book, for example), make it easy for them to buy it. Advertise it like you would someone else’s product. Talk about it at the end of your emails. Make sure that everyone who comes to your site is VERY CLEAR on what you do and how they can buy from you. Because people buy when they’re ready, not when you’re ready.

Conclusion

You’re probably making at least one of these website mistakes, and that’s okay! It’s never too late to fix a website that isn’t working. And if you get stuck, please reach out by commenting below. I love hearing from my readers.
Now go thee forth and make more money!
If you found this post helpful, you should get on my mailing list. And please… share this with someone who needs kick in their website booty.
Useful Resources:*


* this is an affiliate link. Just do some Google searching for the title if you’d rather those pennies stay in Amazon’s/whoever’s pockets instead.

>